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Old Boys’ perspective

Waverley College is extremely fortunate to have a thriving Old Boys network.
 Its members take an active role in supporting and mentoring current students and young graduates, providing an invaluable source of inspiration and experience to our students. The connections the students make during their school days often endure for life, and even for generations. Many Old Boys have been actively involved in helping shape progress at Waverley and their enthusiasm for, and commitment to, helping us evolve is hugely valuable to our College community.

"Social Justice makes the man. It’s a Christian way of being, an attitude. At Waverley we call it the Edmund Rice tradition."

Col Blake, Waverley Old Boy, Class of '62

Waverley College School Bus from 1967 parked in front of the O'Sullivan Garage.

The College Bus in 1967, parked in front of the O'Sullivan Garage

Chris O’Sullivan, Old Boy:

My first and second sons were at Waverley with Col’s first and second sons. My family association goes back to the 1920s when my grandfather was a voluntary teacher here. Dad was schooled here from 1932 – 1938, and I was here from 1961 – 1966. And my other two sons went through Waverley as well. Dad’s business was looking after the College buses that you can see in the photo. I guess we keep coming back because we feel like Waverley is a faith-based family. It’s a place where family traditions really come through, and it supports those values. You really do develop lifelong associations.

Col Blake and Chris O'Sullivan discussing the Waverley College Old Boys

Col Blake, left, talking with Chris O'Sullivan, right.

Col Blake, Old Boy:

I got involved when the kids were in Junior School. I started the track and field supporters’ group. In those days we didn’t have a supporters’ group. When my boys started athletics, the parents weren’t that involved. At a meet everyone was sitting together and you didn’t know who was with Waverley. So I started the group and it took 7 years from coming last to winning it. And one reason we won was that the parents were involved. For the kids it was more of a social thing. These days, there are parent supporters’ groups for everything from music to water polo.

Chris O'Sullivan discussing the Waverley College Old Boys

Chris O'Sullivan

Chris, Old Boy:

No school is perfect. But the great thing about Waverley is that it is striving to get there! There is a balance of academic emphasis along with co-curricular activities. It’s great to see a strong learning culture being developed that’s being supported with great new learning spaces. But more importantly, my wife and I were very aware of the needs of our sons and Waverley was able to meet that broad range of needs.

Discussing the Waverley College Old Boys Union

Col Blake, left, and Chris O'Sullivan, right.

Col, Old Boy:

Some other schools attract a narrow range of students, but Waverley attracts people from every background. You get to meet, experience and live with the different kinds of people that you’ll encounter in life. That’s why you get these lifelong friendships – and it’s really important, because that’s what will support you as a person later on. Now Chris and I are on the Executive of the Old Boys’ Union and working to keep up the connections after school.

Chris, Old Boy:

The school has great traditions – in sport, in cadets, it even has Australia’s oldest Marian Procession – it’s been running for over 100 years. The Old Boys’ Union sponsors reunions and runs a website that keeps people in touch. We have amazing graduates in every field – I guess the most well-known right now is the Governor-General, Sir Peter Cosgrove.

Col Blake and Chris O'Sullivan discussing the Waverley College Old Boys

Col Blake, left, talking with Chris O'Sullivan, right.

Col, Old Boy:

Waverley helps the boys develop their Catholic faith through the Social Justice activities and a strong religious education program. Social Justice makes the man. It’s a Christian way of being, an attitude that means you will always step up for your fellow man. At Waverley we call it the Edmund Rice tradition.

Chris, Old Boy:

The Waverley approach to Social Justice helps the boys develop a sense of mateship and teamwork. You leave Waverley with a diverse range of friendships and an understanding of the need for respecting and being tolerant of one another. But there’s also a sense of being part of the Waverley story. You look back on the years there and you laugh – there are great memories! In my opinion, at Waverley the students get the experiences and things they will need to make their world a better place.