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Wellbeing

From the Deputy Head of College – Students and Staff

Patrick Brennan, Deputy Head - Student and Staff Wellbeing, 2019

From the Deputy Head of College – Students and Staff, Patrick Brennan

High Expectations At Co-curricular Sports at Activities

As we come to the middle of our summer season (for Years 8-12 anyway), it’s a timely reminder of the behavior expected when we as a College community attend co-curricular events.

Co-curricular sports and activities is a critical time where our behavior and sportsmanship are on display to other schools and members of the general public. At times unfortunately, a minority undo a lot of the positive cultural change the majority of our boys, teachers and parents have achieved in recent years.

We encourage all supporters to positively support their school teams and require boys to be dressed in the school’s uniform while doing so.

We expect barracking to be enthusiastic but not to be fanatical or designed to heckle, belittle or disturb the opponents.  For example, barracking, for or against, during a free throw or a kick at goal is always bad sportsmanship. Boys should be encouraged to barrack for their school rather than for an individual team member. Booing, whistling, playing or beating musical instruments are in bad taste and wholly unacceptable.

It is never acceptable to express disapproval of a referee’s or umpire’s decision – no matter whether the referee be adult or schoolboy.

We expect our players to be modest in success and generous in defeat, not showing in either case undue emotion.  Good play, by our own school and by the opposing school, should be applauded willingly and openly.

At all times spectators should leave the area tidy and free of rubbish when they leave.

We look to adults (parents, Old Boys and other spectators) to set an example by their self-control at matches.

I look forward to our next fixture on February 16th against Knox.

The full CAS Code of Conduct is as follows:

Code of conduct

PLAYERS

  • Play by the rules and in a spirit of good sportsmanship
  • Play for the “fun of it” and not just to please parents and Control your temper. Verbal abuse of officials or other players, deliberately fouling or provoking an opponent, and throwing equipment are not acceptable nor permitted in any sport.
  • Work hard both for yourself and your team. Your team’s performance will benefit, so will you.
  • Treat all players as you would like to be treated. Do not interfere with, bully or take unfair advantage of another
  • Co-operate with your coach, team mates and opponents. Without them there would be no game.
  • In the event of a player, or athlete being sent-off during a CAS fixture, it is the responsibility of that boy’s Headmaster at his discretion to determine the penalty. It is generally understood among Headmasters, however, that the boy will serve at least one week’s suspension from participating in the CAS competition.

PARENTS

  • Focus upon the boy’s efforts and performance rather than the overall outcome of the game. This assists the boy in setting realistic goals related to his ability by reducing emphasis on
  • Teach your son that an honest effort is as important as victory, so that the result of the game is accepted without undue
  • Encourage your always to play according to the rules of the
  • Never ridicule or yell at your son or another boy for making a mistake or losing a
  • Remember boys are involved in organised sports for their benefit and enjoyment, not yours.
  • Remember that children learn best from example. Applaud good play by bothIf you disagree with an official, raise the issue through the appropriate channels rather than question the official’s judgement and honesty in public.
  • Remember most officials give their time and effort voluntarily for your son’s
  • Support all efforts to remove verbal and physical abuse from sporting
  • Recognise the value and importance of coaches. They give of their time and resources to provide recreational activities for your son and other boys and deserve your

SPECTATORS

  • We encourage boys to support their school teams and to be dressed in the school’s uniform while doing
  • We expect barracking to be enthusiastic but not to be fanatical or designed to heckle or belittle or disturb the opponents. For example, barracking, for or against, during a kick at goal is always bad sportsmanship. Boys should be encouraged to barrack for their school rather than for an individual team member. Booing, whistling, playing or beating musical instruments are in bad taste and wholly
  • Vocal support for any team should never encourage violence or rough or illegal
  • Encroaching onto the field of play, the shouting out of suggestions for players, referees or umpires to hear are not
  • It is never acceptable to express disapproval of a referee’s or umpire’s decision – no matter whether the referee be adult or
  • There is a complete ban on all alcoholic drinks at grounds where games between Associated Schools’ teams are being
  • We expect our players to be modest in success and generous in defeat, not showing in either case undue emotion. Good play, by our own school and by the opposing school, should be applauded willingly and
  • At all times spectators should leave the area tidy and free of rubbish when they
  • We look to adults (parents, Old Boys and other spectators) to set an example by their self-control at matches.

The Importance of Diet for Healthy Body and Mind

The Australian health and medical research council suggests one in five of us experience a mental health condition in any given year. Waverley College’s wellbeing program acknowledges this and supports the research which shows the benefits of good nutritional habits (including adequate hydration), regular exercise and healthy sleep patterns in reducing the stress which is an inevitable part of our lives. Of these three variables, diet is often overlooked as a way of combatting daily stress and ultimately, more serious mental health conditions.

Psychological problems such as anxiety, depression and low self-esteem can also be linked to a bad diet. While nutritious foods alone are not a silver bullet in terms of mental health, the vitamins in what we eat do have the ability to positively impact our mood, clarity and cognitive ability — ultimately improving our performance at work and school, and the quality of our personal lives. There is a range of foods that can be used to address mood-related issues like sleep, anxiety and depression.

Serotonin, dopamine and the lesser known gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are chemicals in the brain that affect mood. They are not only key to brain function and producing healthy sleep patterns, but may also have a role to play in reducing depression. So what foods will give us these benefits?

Serotonin

You can boost serotonin levels by eating foods that contain tryptophan (an essential amino acid). Foods high in protein and iron in combination with foods such as eggs, cottage cheese, turkey, seafood, chickpeas, nuts and seeds with healthy carbohydrates such as sweet potatoes and quinoa will achieve this. Carbohydrates cause the body to release more insulin, which promotes amino acid absorption. This short-term insulin response drives tryptophan into the brain increasing your serotonin levels.

Dopamine

A good breakfast improves mental performance, and kicking off the work/school day with a full stomach can reduce anxiety. For greater focus and motivation, consider making a dopamine-rich breakfast may include a morning cup of green tea, scrambled eggs or an omelette with high protein veggies (such as broccoli and spinach) that is sprinkled with nuts and seeds (such as pumpkin and sesame) or even just a protein smoothie.

GABA

Gamma-aminobutyric acid is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that has a calming effect on the body. It plays a powerful role in reducing anxiety and depression. Like serotonin and dopamine, GABA is not directly available in food. But the amino acid, glutamine, which can be found in food converts to GABA.

GABA-rich foods include almonds, walnuts, lentils, beef, brown rice, gluten-free whole oats, oranges, bananas, broccoli and spinach.

Combined with exercise and adequate sleep (for a triple hit of dopamine), a good diet could be the key to bouncing back from mental health challenges.

In recent years the College has reviewed its canteen menu, removed sugar drinks from campus and installed additional hydration stations but more needs to be done. This week tuna is being trailed as a lunch option in the canteen.

Parents can assist our drive for a healthier food consumption by visiting healthylunchbox.com.au. This Cancer Council initiative provides parents with snack ideas, sandwich alternatives, recipes, tips and easy healthy swaps for those common lunch box items that are not the best for our kids. Parents can also get their kids involved in choosing lunch box foods they will actually eat and enjoy using the interactive healthy lunch box builder.